Montemayor's Diana

Page 356

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For on the one side if I thought to write,
To make thee knowe my paine which thou hast wrought:
Thy high desertes on th’other came in sight,
To beate downe such a far vnwoorthy thought.
My wearied torments did commaund an I,
Thy souer aine highnes did for bid a No,
And that commaund with reason did denie,
Such woorthinesse and glorie it did showe.
But after this proud boldnes came in place,
Perswading me I should doe well before
To write to thee: But feare did him disgrace,
And said I should but anger thee the more.
And therefore now as feare did ouer come
Braue boldnes, and had throwne it to the ground,
And now that all my senses waxed numme
By feare, which did my feeble hope confound.
Couragiously the God of Loue came in,
And said, vnwoorthy feare packe hence, away:
And come no more, for now thou shalt not win:
I doe commaund, Loue doth commaund I say.
And turning to me in this sort he saide,
As by commaund, nor gently by request,
The fire (when once it is in flames displaide)
Hides not it selfe, but makes it manifest:
Euen so it is impossible to hide
My firie flames, from being sometimes knowne,
And though I would not, yet on euery side
They issue out, that easily they are knowne.
Since then thy Nymph celestiall must knowe,
Either too soone or late thy cruell flame,
Let first thy mouth declare to her thy woe,
Then to thy hand and pen commend the same.
I answered (God wot with fainting hart)
To write to her, it is my chiefe desire;
But if she chaunce to frowne at this bold part,
O God defend my pen should cause her ire.
Thus Loue at last perceiuing what a faint
And hartlesse coward I was, in the end
He wrote to thee, by pitying of my plaint,
And in my name Loue doth this letter send.

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