Montemayor's Diana

Page 294

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maist know, that something thou must not know. To that which thou repliest to me of gracious Crimine, I haue now answered. Crimine not able to suffer these wordes any longer, with teares trickling downe her cheekes, and without speaking a worde went her waies. Delicius went after her to comfort her, and telling her that Parthe∣nius was not yet going, promised to requite the good turne in like manner as she had done to him, by regaining Stelas lost fauour: with hope whereof being somthing cheered vp, she went her waies. And in the meane time I saide thus to Parthenius. How faine would I (Parthenius) not haue thee go thy waies, and as greatly desire that Crimines teares would not mooue thee. For the first I thinke there is no reme∣die (said he) bicause I desire it more then any can imagine: and for the second thou needest take no care, in that thou commandest and I must obey. I knowe thou wilt not go (saide I) without speaking to me. No, answered Parthenius, for that were not possible. Why then God be with thee said I, for I cannot leaue my companie. And with thee, faire Nymph, saide he. Stay a little saide Felismena, for I must needs tell thee, that (in faith) thou didst Delicius great iniury by neuer fauouring him halfe so much, as thou didst Parthenius at that time; whereupon thou wert enclined (it seemes) more to him, then to Delicius. Impatient iealousie was the cause heerof, an∣swered Stela: But harken on, for I was not heerein one whit behinde hande with Delicius, who deserued much, bicause by a most amorous passage which ensued, he shewed an euident proofe of loue and humilitie: For after I had taken my leaue of Parthenius, and going somewhat in haste to ouertake Crimine, I met Delicius by the way, comming backe from accompanying her: who when a pretie way off he espied me in such haste, before I came to him, saide. If I may not offend thee, I beseech thee, (soueraigne Mistresse) when thou commest nigh mee, not to passe by in such haste, bicause I may thinke that thou fliest not from me, if not, thy will be done. Truelie saide all of them, it was highly considered of him, who well deserued to be rewar∣ded, but let vs heare what thou didst answere, or do in hearing these words. With a soft and slowe pace, saide Stela, I came to him saying. Thy request, being so reaso∣nable and modest, I cannot chuse but grant, as all such besides, that sauour of ver∣tue and honest meaning (touching thy selfe) I will neuer disobey, and will not one∣ly go softly bie, but staie with thee as much as thou pleasest, so that I may conueni∣ently ouertake Crimine. I spake all this of purpose, for as he iudged (perhaps) that I shewed Parthenius loue, by the words which I vttered when I departed from him, (wherein I would not haue preferred him before Delicius, since in loue and affection I did not) I therefore endeuoured to make him not imagine any such matter at all. Who in his owne iudgement not able to requite so great a fauour, fell presently downe on his knees (though I did the best I coulde to hinder him) and taking my hand betweene both his, with great humilitie kissed it. Maruelling at such a sud∣den part, and knowing that such presumption proceeded of deepe loue, with pati∣ence I said vnto him. Though for this bold attempt thou deseruest punishment, yet I will not giue it thee, bicause I will not giue thy brother an occasion to be offended with me, by saying that I can pardon nothing. Delicius came to himselfe again, & see∣ing that his boldnes had put him in no smal hazard to leese me, he had such a colour for shame and feare, that it did not a little augment his braue beautie, which I noted too well. Wherefore to encourage him, I said. Art thou content? Delicius answe∣red. O my sweere Mistresse, I, but that I cannot thanke thee so much as I would, and with this I will staie thee no more. Both of vs being gone from one another, I made haste after Crimine, and he to Parthenius, who passed many sweete and amorous spee∣ches
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